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Understanding Your Health

Understanding Your Health

Diabetes Management

Diabetes is a common disease, yet every individual needs unique care. At Good Health Pharmacy we educate our patients with diabetes and their families to learn as much as possible about the latest medical therapies and approaches, as well as healthy lifestyle choices. Good communication with our team of pharmacist and your doctor can help you feel in control and responsive to your changing needs.

Diabetes Management

Diabetes is a common disease, yet every individual needs unique care. At Good Health Pharmacy we educate our patients with diabetes and their families to learn as much as possible about the latest medical therapies and approaches, as well as healthy lifestyle choices. Good communication with our team of pharmacist and your doctor can help you feel in control and responsive to your changing needs.

What is type 1 diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. Only 5% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease. Type 1 diabetes is a more severe form of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. No worries, with the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy lives.

What is type 2 diabetes?

Diabetes is a health condition with your body that causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to rise higher than normal. This is also called hyperglycemia. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Scientists are working rigorously to find out why elevated glucose level causes complications in the human body. If you have type 2 diabetes your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it isn't able to keep up and can't make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Proper glucose management and healthy living lifestyle can counteract your decreased insulin production.

Treating and Managing Diabetes

If you were recently diagnosed with diabetes, don't stress! our pharmacists and technicians are more than happy to help you cope and adjust to a new lifestyle. Stress can lead to increase blood sugar which you don't want. It is a disease to be taken seriously, but you will feel just as you were before your diagnosis just by eating healthy and excersicing.

You might be wondering what is healthy eating?

Healthy eating is implementing more grains,legumes, fruits and vegetables, non-fat dairy food and lean meat in to your diet. Rather than eating a heavy meal in one sitting, try spacing your meal throughout the day by eating smaller portions. Eating big meals can spike your glucose level which can make you feel awful throughout the day. To make understanding eating healthy easier use the "plate method", in which half the plate should be vegetables, a quarter should be protein and a quarter should be starch. It doesnt matter what your cultural meal is, as long as you steer clear of fried and greasy food and apply the plate method, your off to a great start!

Healthy Foods

Get up and get active

Even if you've never exercised before, you can find ways to add physical activity to your day. You'll get benefits, even if your activities aren't strenuous. Once physical activity is a part of your routine, you'll wonder how you did without it.

What Kinds of Physical Activity are Best?

A complete physical activity routine includes four kinds of activity:

  • Activity—walking, using the stairs, moving around—throughout the day
  • Aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, swimming, or dancing
  • Strength training, like lifting light weights
  • Flexibility exercises, such as stretching

Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic exercise makes your heart and bones strong, relieves stress and improves blood circulation. It also lowers your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke by keeping your blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels on target. Aim for about 30 minutes a day, at least 5 days a week. If you haven't been very active recently, start out with 5 or 10 minutes a day. Then work up to more time each week. Or split up your activity for the day—try a brisk 10-minute walk three times each day. If you're trying to lose weight, you may want to aim for more than 30 minutes a day.

Here are some ways to get aerobic exercise:

  • Take a brisk walk every day
  • Go dancing or take a dance aerobics class
  • Swim or do water aerobics
  • Take a bicycle ride outdoors or use a stationary bicycle indoors

Strength Training

Strength training helps build strong bones and muscles and makes everyday chores like carrying groceries easier. With more muscle, you burn more calories, even at rest.

Do your strength routine several times a week. Here are some ways to do strength training:

  • Lift light weights at home
  • Join a class that uses weights, elastic bands, or plastic tubes
  • When you travel,make time to use the hotel fitness center. Or bring lightweight, easy to pack resistance bands with you

Flexibility Exercises

Flexibility exercises, also called stretching, help keep your joints limber and lower your chances of getting hurt. Gentle stretching for 5 to 10 minutes helps your body warm up and get

ready for activities and cool down afterwards.

How to Get Started

Choose one or two things you'd like to try to get started. Then set a realistic, achievable plan to make it happen. Learn more about setting realistic, achievable goals.

Keep a Record of Your Progress

Keep track of your activity. You might find that writing everything down helps keep you on target. Think about what works best for you. You might try a notebook, calendar, spreadsheet, cell phone or online activity tracker to log and record your progress.

Cholesterol

Coming Soon...

Stroke

Coming Soon...

Allergies

Coming Soon...

Diabetes Management

Diabetes is a common disease, yet every individual needs unique care. At Good Health Pharmacy we educate our patients with diabetes and their families to learn as much as possible about the latest medical therapies and approaches, as well as healthy lifestyle choices. Good communication with our team of pharmacist and your doctor can help you feel in control and responsive to your changing needs.

What is type 1 diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. Only 5% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease. Type 1 diabetes is a more severe form of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. No worries, with the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy lives.

What is type 2 diabetes?

Diabetes is a health condition with your body that causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to rise higher than normal. This is also called hyperglycemia. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Scientists are working rigorously to find out why elevated glucose level causes complications in the human body. If you have type 2 diabetes your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it isn't able to keep up and can't make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Proper glucose management and healthy living lifestyle can counteract your decreased insulin production.

Treating and Managing Diabetes

If you were recently diagnosed with diabetes, don't stress! our pharmacists and technicians are more than happy to help you cope and adjust to a new lifestyle. Stress can lead to increase blood sugar which you don't want. It is a disease to be taken seriously, but you will feel just as you were before your diagnosis just by eating healthy and excersicing.

You might be wondering what is healthy eating?

Healthy eating is implementing more grains,legumes, fruits and vegetables, non-fat dairy food and lean meat in to your diet. Rather than eating a heavy meal in one sitting, try spacing your meal throughout the day by eating smaller portions. Eating big meals can spike your glucose level which can make you feel awful throughout the day. To make understanding eating healthy easier use the "plate method", in which half the plate should be vegetables, a quarter should be protein and a quarter should be starch. It doesnt matter what your cultural meal is, as long as you steer clear of fried and greasy food and apply the plate method, your off to a great start!

Healthy Foods

Get up and get active

Even if you've never exercised before, you can find ways to add physical activity to your day. You'll get benefits, even if your activities aren't strenuous. Once physical activity is a part of your routine, you'll wonder how you did without it.

What Kinds of Physical Activity are Best?

A complete physical activity routine includes four kinds of activity:

  • Activity—walking, using the stairs, moving around—throughout the day
  • Aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, swimming, or dancing
  • Strength training, like lifting light weights
  • Flexibility exercises, such as stretching

Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic exercise makes your heart and bones strong, relieves stress and improves blood circulation. It also lowers your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke by keeping your blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels on target. Aim for about 30 minutes a day, at least 5 days a week. If you haven't been very active recently, start out with 5 or 10 minutes a day. Then work up to more time each week. Or split up your activity for the day—try a brisk 10-minute walk three times each day. If you're trying to lose weight, you may want to aim for more than 30 minutes a day.

Here are some ways to get aerobic exercise:

  • Take a brisk walk every day
  • Go dancing or take a dance aerobics class
  • Swim or do water aerobics
  • Take a bicycle ride outdoors or use a stationary bicycle indoors

Strength Training

Strength training helps build strong bones and muscles and makes everyday chores like carrying groceries easier. With more muscle, you burn more calories, even at rest.

Do your strength routine several times a week. Here are some ways to do strength training:

  • Lift light weights at home
  • Join a class that uses weights, elastic bands, or plastic tubes
  • When you travel,make time to use the hotel fitness center. Or bring lightweight, easy to pack resistance bands with you

Flexibility Exercises

Flexibility exercises, also called stretching, help keep your joints limber and lower your chances of getting hurt. Gentle stretching for 5 to 10 minutes helps your body warm up and get

ready for activities and cool down afterwards.

How to Get Started

Choose one or two things you'd like to try to get started. Then set a realistic, achievable plan to make it happen. Learn more about setting realistic, achievable goals.

Keep a Record of Your Progress

Keep track of your activity. You might find that writing everything down helps keep you on target. Think about what works best for you. You might try a notebook, calendar, spreadsheet, cell phone or online activity tracker to log and record your progress.

Cholesterol

Coming Soon...

Stroke

Coming Soon...

Allergies

Coming Soon...


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